How And What Made Oyo Empire Collapse?

Shortly after Oyo Empire expanded her influence westwards, capturing Port Novo and making Dahomey (present-day Benin Republic) a vassal state pay tributes of 40 guns and 400 loads of cowries and corals regularly to Oyo, of course after phases of wars that made Oyo army a dread to the Dahomeyans, Alafin (Emperor) Labisi appointed a new Basorun (Prime Minister).

To check the Alaafin from becoming too dictatorial, the Prime Minister according to the constitution could pass a vote of no confidence that would turn the Oyo Mesi (Legislators) against the Alaafin and an empty calabash would be handed to the emperor signaling that he was required commit suicide and pave way for a new Alaafin since the Oyo Mesi had lost confidence in his rule.

The Basorun was a high priest controlling all the cults except Sango and Ifa, so this could make him declare that the ancestors and Heavens had lost confidence in an Alaafin. Prior to the appointment of Ga, the unwritten constitution of the empire had been amended from the more ancient style that the Aremo (heir apparent) ruled after an Alaafin passed on.

The new constitution demanded that the heir apparent died with the Alaafin so as to pass on succession without disputes and in a way make the monarchical system a sort of republic. This made Basorun Ga more powerful. Ga became despotic and power drunk and from the slightest accusation that an Alaafin or his Prince disrespected the Oyo Mesi to the accusation that an Alaafin was assuming airs of superiority, Basorun Ga raised five Alaafins to the throne and successively destroyed four of them.

He and his family ruled despotically for twenty years, almost as if they were the Alaafins. By the reign of the fifth emperor, Alaafin Abiodun, the people were fed up of Ga’s dictatorship. On an appointed day, with the support of Are-Ona Kakanfo (Military Commander of Oyo army) Oyabi, the Alaafin and the people broke the jinx of Ga’s powerful magic and rounded up all his family (except Ojo, Ga’s first son) and were seized and killed, Ga himself was burnt to death in his house.

Abiodun’s reign then went on peacefully and lasted from 1774 to 1789, his was a golden reign. However, the center was no longer holding the seams of the Empire together after 20 years of internal imbalance triggered by Ga. Taking advantage of the lawless years, Egba province under the warrior, Lishabi, had proclaimed their independence and migrated towards their present location in Abeokuta. The Egbas had been aggrieved by the oppression of the resident Ilaris (governors) in their three provinces within the empire and the absence of any authority to hold them in check.

When authority was installed by Abiodun, he sent a punitive expedition against the Egbas, but the rocky hills of Abeokuta made the Oyo cavalry failed woefully in subjecting the Egbas. This triggered a domino effect of provinces declaring their independence from Oyo. Even Dahomey had the effrontery to assault Ketu, a westernmost Yoruba district, without fear of the Oyo imperial army. As far as Ewe (in today’s Togo), Oyo began to wane.

But within the city, Abiodun restated law and order but his reign came to an end with his death in 1789 and a new Alaafin was crowned, Alaafin Awole who reigned between 1789 to 1796). Alaafin Awole did not help matters he could have consolidated Abiodun’s effort to keep the empire together, but he did not. Under Awole, Afonja was the Are Ona Kakanfo (Military Commander), though the two of them had vied for the throne.

It was a taboo in Oyo constitution for the Alaafin and Are to live in the same city, so while the emperor resided in the capital, the Are must reside elsewhere, especially a town where enemy threat is imminent. Afonja was also from a royal family but he was slave-born and it was probable this that played against his becoming emperor, though some chiefs of the Oyo Mesi sympathized with him. Afonja’s great-grandfather had been the founder of Ilorin.

Alaafin Awole began to lose the Oyo Mesi’s confidence when he firstly requested Afonja to attack Apomu as part of a yearly military exercise the Alaafin must order the Oyo army to revive its strength, but Awole’s omission was that Apomu was an Ile Ife town and it is contrary to the “Coronation Oath” of the Alaafins who all received their royal swords from Ife and sworn never to raise sword against Ife. Secondly, Awole again ordered Afonja to attack Iwere town, which was a fortified fortress impregnable to Oyo army’s weapons of swords and arrows.

It was a calculated attempt by Awole to get rid of Are Afonja since the Are must kill himself if he ever failed to win any battle (this had also been the secret of the Oyo army’s strength in its heydays, since the Are must fight to be killed or fight to win resulting, making his army fight to the finish without option of retreat).

Afonja sensed this and rather than launch a battle he would not win he refused on the pretext that the town, Iwere, was the maternal home of Alaafin Ajagbo. Ajagbo was Alaafin in 1587 to 1624 and had created the Are Ona Kakanfo, Basorun, Agbakin and Asipa titles, which were military titled except Basorun and Asipa which were administrative. The third reason that Oyo Mesi lost confidence in Awole was trying to introduce Islam into Yorubaland.

Yorubas generally distrusted Islam in the polity and it is unacceptable according to the constitution for the Alaafin to accept the religion because of its male dominance and autocratic nature of the emirs. Note that women make up part of the Oyo Mesi (Legislators) and there were powerful women like Efunsetan Aniwura who had their say in the polity for Oyo was not totally a male dominated society. Besides, the Alaafin was not allowed to wield total power like the emirs did in the north.

Soon the Oyo Mesi sent the empty calabash to Awole and he had to commit suicide. Awole was not missed for his reign further declined the empire and left the bullying ilaris unchecked in their districts. The center no longer held and even the next Alaafin’s reign were so short as people became disillusioned and in want of effective leadership. Adebo ruled for 130 days, Maku was next and was there for only two months thereafter an inter-regnum lasted in the capital from 1797 to 1803.

Afonja’s influence thus began to grow. Afonja tried to become emperor, but some chiefs opposed this. Thus in 1817, he declared Ilorin also independent just as other provinces were also doing. Afonja had a Fulani adviser, Mallam Alimi, and he encouraged dan Fodio jihadists warriors to support Afonja.

Meanwhile, Fulani/Hausas were popularly used in Yorubaland as cheap labors and servants, they were so popular that looking down the nose upon the northerners continued well into post-colonial years in Nigeria. So with the call to arms, Hausa/Fulani laborers in the Oyo underground economy swelled the ranks by fleeing to Ilorin. Ojo, the only surviving son of Ga, along with the Onikoyi of Ikoyi, which was then the largest provincial town of Oyo hence marched against Ilorin.

The Ikoyi’s were the royal battalion of the imperial army and were also known as Ikoyi-Eso (Guards Battalion). When the war began and Hausa/Fulani ex-laborers roamed the country pillaging and selling their former Yoruba aristocratic masters as slaves to white slave buyers (as happened to Ajayi Crowther and his mother who were sold to Portuguese when their village was sacked by the Muslims later in 1821: read earlier post of Eshu and Christian Devil on this blog), Afonja became displeased with this.

And since he was still suspected of being loyal to Yoruba than Islam, Alimi had Afonja killed and his son, Abdul Salami took Ilorin throne as emir giving allegiance to the Sokoto caliphate. Thus Ilorin became a part of the Sokoto caliphate. There was no central authority anymore in Oyo and a lot of the provinces kept breaking away and the disunity did not give a common cause to the Yorubas to fight and retake Ilorin.

Some Yorubas by this time living in Ilorin had also accepted Islam and thus while Ilorin swelled with a platform for its warriors to fight on in one cause, there was no single cause the Yorubas stood for a united fight. The center no longer held and things badly fallen apart. There was no more cavalry for the Oyo army since horses were before bought from northern trade routes which were now closed because of the war against Fulani/Hausa.

The Muslims finally wiped the Oyo capital city after several futile battles on the side of the decimated Yorubas. Oyo’s new capital was now transferred further south to Ago-Oja and a new Alafin, Atiba, was crowned. But by this time, the Alaafin was struggling to maintain a dignity that was lost. Yorubaland became like the Greek city states of Athens, Sparta, Macedonia e.t.c. as Yoruba city states like Owu, Egba, Ijebu, Ondo and Ijesha begun to emerge, with even facial marks emphasizing their differences.

Civil wars became rampant, famine spread like wildfire and slave hunting, slavery before this time was totally alien to the Yorubas since Oyo did not allow any Yorubas to be traded as slave. The slave coasts were now overcrowded with Yoruba slaves as Hausa/Fulani armies slave-hunted in the confusion of collapsed Oyo.

A new war brewed when Ijebu (whose reputation as businessmen is known even till today) and Ife also began to sell refugees from old Oyo as slaves. Owu and these refugees therefore attacked Ife, the sacred city. This turned Ijebu and Ife against Owu.

The Ijebus were the first to employ the use of guns in any battle and thus completely destroyed Owu town. Owu people fled to Egba for refuge where they remain till today in Abeokuta. Ijebu attacked Egba for harboring Owu and a long bitter war ensued between Ijebu and Egba. However, the larger part of these Owu refugees were civilians.

The Owu warriors and other warriors from other destroyed or sacked provinces rather migrated further south and found a settlement in Eleiyele, thus beginning what today is known as Ibadan. Soon it began to attract other warriors who wanted to restore the old glory and because of its position in the rainforest area, Ibadan began to control palm oil belt which was just beginning to replace the trade in human beings.

But still determined to totally expand the Sokoto caliphate downwards by totally conquering the dying embers of the Yoruba influence, the Hausa/Fulani cavalry relaunched another phase of war as they saw New Oyo and Ibadan rising.

Ibadan knew it could no longer control cavalry which used to be a reckonable force in the Oyo army (Yoruba kings and chiefs still ride horses in celebration today as remnant of the horse tradition proir to these wars) but with the Sokoto caliphate in the north, Ibadan could no longer get horse supplies.Although, Ijebu first used the guns, but Ibadan, through insistent drills, perfected the use of guns in such remarkable ways.

Ibadan infantry soon marched out to meet the jihadists who were pillaging villages and towns with impunity. Finally, a decisive battle was fought in Oshogbo in 1839, led by the dreaded new Are Ona Kakanfo, Balogun Latoisha.

The Ibadan infantry were good marksmen and they plucked the jihadist riders off their horses in such a way that many lives were lost on the side of the Hausa/Fulani invaders and the casualty toll was so high that they fled back up north, ending the prolonged Fulani/Yoruba wars and the incursion of the jihadists in a very decisive victory.

Thus Ibadan emerged as the superpower of the Yoruba states. It was no surprised then that after independence in Nigeria, Chief Obafemi Awolow, an Ijebu statesman, made Ibadan the capital seat of the Western region which is largely Yoruba region of Nigeria.

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21 Responses to How And What Made Oyo Empire Collapse?

  1. Yinka Adeogun says:

    This is a well researched and written piece of work. I love the way you presented your facts in a chronological order as well as your unbiased account of events. Through your write up, I have learnt about how Abeokuta came into existence, the vastness of the Oyo empire & the method Islam got introduced into Ilorin.
    I am also impressed by the fact that women had a say in the government way back as they were part of the legislators (Oyomesi). This fact can serve as an answer to those who erroneously believe that Africa/Nigeria is uncivilized & do not include women in the affairs of the state. I would have loved to see your sources though. I totally enjoyed reading it.

    • takeupanarm says:

      I have nothing to declare except ingenuity, Ingenuity however must be opened to criticism (objective criticism) so make personal researches on your own and pls do let me know when your findings contradict mine. Thanx

  2. Akingbile Toyin says:

    You did well and am very happy about this most of people that is yoruba self don’t know this kind story Baba Ifasayo Alabi have tell ours and tell ours some odu IfA about oyo town am very happy for you keep on and good lock I love you

    • takeupanarm says:

      The future belongs toi those that are fluid and nonlinear; with your kinda mindset, the future belongs to your likes. But pls, I cannot get you on facebook because there are many with your name. Mine of facebook is BOLAJI FAKEYE, displaying a lion on the wall. I will like to add u, pls.

  3. Ohi says:

    I was lucky enough to have heard the oral version told by the blogger himself before this post was published. This is even better-detailed. We need more of this

    • takeupanarm says:

      A lot of truth has been lost to Christianity: Poseidon’s Trident has become their Devil’s pitchfork, wise’s cone hats became for witchesPentagon star that used to belong to Venus now symbol of war and now our own dear “kadacian” Eshu symbolizes God’s antagonist. The blog will hopefully reveal more stuff that had been lost to racism. Thanx a zill.
      Lest I forget, I’m through with Alchemist, got anymore? I’m starving, feed my mind!

  4. Oyadare says:

    Wonderful article, this is important information, thanks for sharing!

    • takeupanarm says:

      Thank you too for reading… I only hope however that such information play the gradually hope we hope for, that enlightenment spread among our people and we as a race walk heads high wherever we are. Africans have great legacy… Let me know if u are on FB.

  5. The Owu account though partly true is not accurate in how the Owu came to Abeokuta. Owu are noted warriors that protected Abeokuta and were the first to settle there. I will like to know the source of this account so we could debate it and bring clarity to timeline and which event preceeded which, and what led to such events. Graet article though..

    • takeupanarm says:

      I tried to add u on FB but dont know which of the adeboye adegbenros… anyways, mine is BOLAJI FAKEYE with a lion head. One major thing we shoud note in history is objectivity. Most histories because of the oral makeup before they got written down lose facts. Modakekes are not the initial inhabitants of Ife but today they are claiming otherwise. Oduduwa was a stranger to Ife but crowned king, today his descendants have as any rights as the indigenous ppl. North Africa was at a time not filled with Arabs except the merchants passing through, today, North Africa is so Arab we will picture the pharaohs of being Arab stock. Lishabi led the Egbas to Abeokuta initially, it was later the Owus arrived. the Owu war came later, for Owu as a city before its destruction was a very thriving walled city enviable to the Ijebus. The Owus were good warriros that was why they did a lot in starting what is today Ibadan. But most of them arrived Abeokuta as refugees and which is why the Alake is the paramount ruler of Abeokuta. there was a time talk was rife of elevating the Olowu but the Egbas resisted this because of the history that theirs is Abeokuta and they had taken in the Owus. I will not be surprised to know u are Owu; I am from neither, I am just being objective. If Owus were the first to settle there Olowu would have been the paramount ruler… every tribe tries to use oral history for elevation, even the Jews did it and this is being believeed by millions because of what Moses wrote. Many of the Egypt stuff and Jericho walls breaking are not accurate truths they were only to imbue patriotic love of one’s country. If Owus got their first they will not watch Alake crowning himself as paramount chiefs, moreover do u also remember the Egba-Dahomey wars, it would have been Owu-Egba if the Egbas had tried to take over Owu assuming Abeokuta was the latter’s.

  6. @Akingbile Toyin, are you willing to share Baba Ifasayo Alabi’s story with us. That is invaluable and thanks to this extensive research by takeupanarm. You could inbox me on my Facebook account, or better still share on this blog. Best wishes.

  7. Just a thought. If the Yoruba Nation should break away in the future, we might have to revisit and contest the Ilorin township ruled by the Sokoto Caliphate.

    • takeupanarm says:

      I think Nigeria is becoming too enlightened for any breakaway. It is just those northerners that are giving us problems and this reason is just because there is very little difference of IQ between them and their cattle; there leaders have deprived them something the Yoruba’s have always had… education/enlightenment… Yorubas love education anyway, even Western education has more Yoruba products than any others in Nigeria. We are too enlightened for such jingoism anymore and in time- and with patience – they will get to catch up… because even their leaders would not want a break up of Nigeria. ppl like Dangote will not see Nigeria on political fussion but economic, without Nigeria most of their aristocratic class will suffer and they too know, they have enjoyed power for too long in their autocratic emir-style democracy is alien to them. But I think they will blend, yet there will be bloodshed I know, but Nigeria will not break up. Even the world will not allow it.

  8. Native says:

    Thanks for a well done and researched article.

  9. TUNDE OKEDIJI says:

    Your piece is very educative and well articulated; it confirms Oyo- Alaafin as the flower of. the Yoruba race. Well done

  10. ejim blessing akachu says:

    thank u so much for your article.it really helped me in completing an assignment our detail-loving lecturer gave us.it was very useful.

  11. akinleye wale says:

    read this and pass any exam concerning oyo history in the past

  12. Janet Angel says:

    Please be giving clear answers to our questions.

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